Sustainability Performance

For us, creating value goes far beyond economic performance. It means doing the right thing. In the right way. For our employees. For our customers. For our communities. For our environment.

Georgia-Pacific Safety Performance

Nothing is more important than keeping our employees safe. Georgia-Pacific never stops looking for ways to improve.

  • 1.63
    2015
  • 1.89
    2016
  • 1.96
    2017
  • 1.11
    2014
  • 1.04
    2015
  • 1.12
    2016
  • 0.69
    2014
  • 0.65
    2015
  • 0.63
    2016
  • 12072
    2014
  • 7689
    2015
  • 4687
    2016
  • 80
    2014
  • 51
    2015
  • 43
    2016

Total Case Incidence Rate (TCIR) is the number of recordable incidents per 100 full-time employees during a given time period.

Days Away/Restricted or Transfer Rate (DART) indicates the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time employees in a given time that resulted in days away from work, restricted work activity and/or a job transfer. Lower rates show the severity of workplace injuries is decreasing.

Lost Time Incidence Rate (LTIR) is the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time employees in a given time frame that resulted in days away from work. These incidents represent the most severe injury cases, so lower rates mean fewer severe workplace injuries.

Near Misses reflect when an employee could have been hurt but was not. Near misses help identify potential hazards on the job so injuries can be prevented.

Serious Injuries and Fatalities (SIF) Serious injuries are considered incidents with at least 10 days of lost time and result in a fatality, amputation, fracture, dislocation, crushing injury, laceration, burn, shock and/or inhalation.

Energy Management - Our Goal

GP strives to be a leader in managing its energy use and continuing its use of renewable energy in its complex manufacturing processes. GP is committed to using energy economically and decreasing the intensity of purchased energy (non-biomass) and associated greenhouse gas emissions in its operations.

Energy Use by Source (as a percentage of total energy consumption)

Georgia-Pacific's largest energy source is biomass – wood fiber, bark and other organic materials. We have used these materials for many years to help power our wood and paper manufacturing facilities.

  • 56
    2009
  • 61
    2012
  • 58
    2015
  • 38
    2009
  • 33
    2012
  • 35
    2015
  • 6
    2009
  • 6
    2012
  • 7
    2015

Total Energy Consumption (billions of Btu)

Georgia-Pacific promotes energy efficiency in all our operations. We have an ongoing company-wide effort to reduce energy use and increase energy efficiency. The 30 percent increase in total energy consumption between 2009 and 2015 is due to the addition of more than 15 manufacturing facilities during that time period.

  • 270063
    2009
  • 352874
    2012
  • 351862
    2015

Environmental Performance

This diagram shows changes in Georgia-Pacific's environmental performance in key areas from 2009 to 2015.

Sulfur Dioxide (S02) (measured in tons per year)
Sulfur dioxide is a pollutant of concern to the U.S. EPA because, under certain conditions, it can form acid precipitation and cause other air quality concerns. At pulp and paper mills, sulfur dioxide is formed primarily by burning fossil fuels. Between 2009 and 2015, SO2 emissions at GP’s pulp and paper mills decreased nearly 39 percent primarily because we increased the use of cleaner burning fuels, such as natural gas.

Nitrogen Oxide Compounds (NOx) (measured in tons per year)
Nitrogen oxide compounds are pollutants of concern to the U.S. EPA because they can combine with other organic compounds to form ground level ozone, a major component of haze or smog in some areas. Power boilers and other combustion equipment at our facilities generate NOx. Emissions of these compounds have remained unchanged between 2009 and 2015.

Total Reduced Sulfur (TRS) (measured in tons per year)
TRS is responsible for the odor often associated with pulp and paper mills. It is a result of the kraft process for cooking wood chips to make pulp. Our TRS emissions show an increase of 28 percent between 2009 and 2015. Two factors are primarily responsible for this increase. First, since 2009, we have been able to use new computer models to help us more accurately calculate existing TRS emissions from GP pulp and paper mills. Second, in 2012 new regulations required public reporting of hydrogen sulfide emissions, which also contributed to the increase.

Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) (measured in pounds per year)
A standard measure of water quality, BOD is a test that quantifies organic pollutant loading in pulp and paper mill wastewater. From 2009 to 2015, GP’s BOD discharges declined by 6 percent overall. This was the result of improvements in the operating efficiency of wastewater treatment systems at several mills.

Total Suspended Solids (TSS) (measured in pounds per year)
TSS is a standard measure of water quality that defines the amount of material suspended in the wastewater of pulp and paper mills. From 2009 – 2015, GP’s TSS discharges declined 1 percent overall.

Effluent Flow (measured in millions of gallons per year)
We measure water use efficiency based on the flow of effluent, or wastewater, from our pulp and paper mills. While a significant amount of water flows through our mill systems, only about 12 percent of that water is consumed during the pulp and papermaking process. The rest is recycled and reused, then treated and discharged. GP’s effluent flow declined 12 percent between 2009 and 2015 because of projects at some large containerboard mills that resulted in reduced water use.

Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) (measured in millions of pounds)
The U.S. EPA requires companies to report quantities of designated chemicals that certain industrial facilities release annually into the air, water and land. Between 2009 and 2015, GP’s TRI releases and transfers increased by about 19 percent. During that time, we began reporting hydrogen sulfide emissions for the first time. We also used a new computer model to help us more accurately calculate existing emissions of methanol, which contributed to the increase.

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) (measured in metric tons per year)
Carbon dioxide is considered a greenhouse gas and is an emission of concern to the U.S. EPA. It is generated by burning fossil fuels as well as other industrial processes. GP’s CO2e emissions increased by 14 percent between 2009 and 2015 due, in part, to the acquisition of new facilities.